TCP Monitoring – How does it function?

TCP Monitoring: An Overview

One of the most essential network device monitors is TCP Monitoring. When a device responds to a ping, we can assume it is connected to the network and proceed to the next step, which is to confirm the availability of the required services. The services provided by a network device are all accessible via ports. They can then be reached via TCP or UDP.

By enabling TCP Monitoring, you may determine whether a service is accessible on a certain port on the network device. For instance, every website is hosted by a web service provider. These services can be accessed by default on ports 80 (non-secure) or 443 (secure). We can therefore check to see if the network device’s web server service is TCP-accessible by setting a TCP Monitor on port 80.

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What is the purpose of UDP?

UDP is the topic for our article today. We will explore it in detail – what is its purpose, how it works, and why is it so beneficial. So, let’s start. 

UDP – what does it mean?

UDP means User Datagram Protocol. It is a well-known communications protocol that provides a high-speed solution. It is used to create low-latency and loss-tolerant connections between different Internet services.

The User Datagram Protocol speeds up the communication process by allowing data to be transferred before the receiver agrees. As a result, for time-sensitive communications such as DNS lookups, Voice over IP (VoIP), video, or audio transfers, User Datagram Protocol is the recommended alternative.

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